Carl T. Bogus

Photo Bogus at DeskCarl T. Bogus is Distinguished Research Professor of Law at the Roger Williams University School of Law in Bristol, Rhode Island.  He teaches Torts, Products Liability, Antitrust Law, and other courses. He has held visiting positions at the Rutgers-Camden, Drexel, and George Washington University law schools.

Professor Bogus has written and spoken extensively about torts and the civil justice system, gun control and the Second Amendment, and political ideology.  He is the author of William F. Buckley Jr. and the Rise of American Conservatism (Bloomsbury Press) and Why Lawsuits Are Good for America: Disciplined Democracy, Big Business, and the Common Law (NYU Press), and the editor of The Second Amendment in Law and History: Historians and Constitutional Scholars on the Right to Bear Arms (The New Press).  In addition to many professional journals, his writings have appeared in newspapers including USA Today, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Washington Times, and the Providence Journal; in The Nation, American Prospect, American Conservative, and Tikkun magazines; and on the National Review and CNN websites.

Professor Bogus received the Ross Essay Award from the American Bar Association for his article "The Invasion of Panama and the Rule of Law," and the Public Service Achievement Award from Common Cause of Rhode Island for his work on separation of powers in that state.

He lives in Washington, DC.

You can access his full CV here.

A number of professional articles by Professor Bogus posted on the Social Science Research Network are available here.

About the Author

BOGUSBWphoto 

Carl T. Bogus is Distinguished Research Professor of Law at Roger Williams University.

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NEW PROJECT

There are structural problems in the U.S. economy that benefit the richest one-tenth of one percent and work to the detriment of the middle class. Professor Bogus believes that one of these problems is corporate giantism fueled by mergers and acquisitions. Very big companies are merging or gobbling up smaller firms at alarming rates. In a major new article, Professor Bogus argues for a radical change in antitrust law to confront this issue, and why antitrust needs to become a subject of wide public debate, as it was during the Progressive Era. This article is accessible to readers not conversant with antitrust law. To access it, click on its title and citation below:

The New Road to Serfdom: The Curse of Bigness and the Failure of Antitrust, 49 University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform 1 (2015)

 

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